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Background Check Legislation Advances in Illinois

WGIL Newsroom . State News 133

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — A proposal to restrict most businesses from asking job applicants about their criminal record until later in the hiring process has advanced through the Illinois Legislature.

A Senate committee voted 11-2 Wednesday to approve the legislation. It wouldn’t allow employers with more than 15 employees to inquire about criminal history until the applicant is determined to be qualified.

The measure excludes construction, emergency medical services and security-related businesses. It also doesn’t apply to jobs that currently require background checks under law.

Supporters say the measure would give former criminals a better chance to improve their lives.

But opponents say it could contradict certain background check requirements in the health care industry.

Chicago Democratic state Sen. Tony Munoz is sponsoring the legislation.

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